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    Thumbs up Ministry of Water Resources - Press Releases.

    Artificial Recharge of Ground Water

    PRESS RELEASE ON ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER

    1. We know that groundwater management is critical to India’s water, food and livelihood security. Groundwater supports more than 55% of our irrigation requirements, 85% of domestic requirements in rural areas and over 50% of requirements in urban and industrial uses in the country. With water levels declining, we need a national movement for recharge. The first meeting of the Artificial Recharge of Groundwater Advisory Council met this morning to deliberate on how the movement for rainwater harvesting and artificial recharge can be made more effective and transformed into a people’s movement.

    The decisions/recommendations of the Council are:
    1. The Government of India has constituted a Central Goundwater Authority under the provision of the Environment Protection Act 1986 to control and regulate groundwater development and management in the country. A comprehensive model bill for regulation of groundwater development and management has been framed and circulated to all the states for adoption. The Model Bill provides for the setting up of State Groundwater Authority on similar consideration as the CGWA. The Model Bill also envisages issue of direction to the state local bodies/institutions for making rainwater harvesting mandatory in feasible areas. The Council suggested that those states which have not yet enacted suitable legislation may be persuaded to do so and urged the Ministry to organize a chief minister’s conference as early as possible to discuss these issues.

    2. All 1065 blocks categorized as over-exploited/critical and semi-critical need to adopt artificial groundwater recharge measures adopting appropriate area specific technology. The Council felt concerned about this decline and suggested urgent action by the Central Groundwater Board to prioritise action for recharge and rainwater harvesting in these districts.

    3. The Council recommended that the Ground Water Board will prioritise the work on the 31 districts, which have been identified as ‘farmers’ distress hot spot’, districts. It will provide assessment of ground water availability and possibility of artificial recharge in these districts. It is necessary to evolve a system of information sharing and access for the civil society in general and farmers in particular to ensure adoption of optimum methods and effective strategies in this regard, so that the present situation where failed borewells are adding to the debt burden of farmers can be ended.

    4. With a view to regulate the withdrawal of groundwater, the Central Ground Water Authority (CGWA) has circulated a list of 1615 assessment units (over-exploited, critical and semi-critical) to State Pollution Control Boards and the Ministry of Environment & Forests for regulating withdrawal of ground water by industries. It has also notified 20 critical over-exploited areas banning further extraction of ground water and has notified 51 areas for registration of ground water extraction structures for further regulation.

    The Council suggests that there is need to regulate large users of groundwater particularly industrial users. The Council resolved to set up a sub-committee to work on a policy for water for industries, which provides the framework for regulation as well as incentives for economic use for large users of groundwater. This policy can be put to the Council at its next meeting for further discussion and finalisation.

    5. The Council endorses the recommendation of the National Commission on Farmers that crops like ragi, bajra, jowar and pulses that utilize less water, and are grown by farmers in rainfed areas could be made part of the public distribution system.

    6. Artificial Recharge of groundwater aquifers require adoption of different technologies under different ecological and hydro-geological situations. The modern recharge technologies must be integrated with the diversity of community managed traditional water harvesting technologies. The Council suggested that there is a need to develop separate technologies for recharge specifically for urban areas.

    7. The Council resolved to set up a sub-committee which takes into account the manuals/material developed by the CGWB and suggest strategies for wider and more effective dissemination of available information and know-how, up to the user level.

    The Sub-Committee may comprise the following:-
    1. Ms. Sunita Narayan - Chairperson
    2. Mr. Anna Hazare
    3. Mr. Rajinder Singh
    4. Ms. Rohani Nilekani
    5. Mr. Achyut Das
    6. Member, CGWB
    7. JS (Administration), Ministry of Water Resources, Government of India.

    8. One media person to be recommended by the Press Council of India.

    2. National Congress on Groundwater.
    To facilitate the sharing of information a National Congress on Groundwater will be organized once a year for achieving coordination with government agencies, NGOs, industries and academia. An annual award for outstanding village community working on Pani Panchayat will be instituted and given at this Congress. The Ministry will constitute a committee for preparing guidelines for this award.

    3. FINALISATION OF MEMBERS UNDER CATEGORY (B) OF RESOLUTION.
    Secretaries in-charge of Water Resources of the following States were nominated by the Advisory Council for inclusion as members on rotational basis (for two years):
    1. West Bengal
    2. Rajasthan
    3. Punjab
    4. Madhya Pradesh
    5. Karnataka
    6. Meghalaya
    7. J & K

    The Advisory Council suggested that there should be a separate representation of the island States in view of specific problems faced by them and recommended nomination of Secretary in-charge of Water Resources of Andaman & Nicobar Islands as a member of the Advisory Council.

    4. Follow up on Prime Minister’s Suggestions

    1. More crop and income per drop of water
    A sub-committee with Prof. M. S. Swaminathan as Chairman and scientists from IARI, ICRISAT, CRIDA, CAZRI, Agricultural Universities and Central Water Commission and Central Ground Water Board will prepare a paper within two months. This will be considered at the next meeting of the Council.

    2. Paani Panchayats
    This will be discussed with the Minister for Panchayati Raj and concrete steps will be taken to set up community managed Water Banks.

    3. Avoiding failed Bore Wells.
    The 31 agrarian distress hot spot areas will be taken up immediately for providing the best available scientific advice.

    4. Linkage with the National Rain-fed Area Authority
    The Council can function in close coordination with the proposed Authority.

    5. Nationwide Campaign for Recharge.
    A water literacy movement will be launched, including the use of the Village Knowledge Centres or Gyan Chaupals. A content consortium will be formed for every major agro-climatic zone.

    6. Achieving Convergance and Coherence among Government Departments/Agencies.
    The Council will function as a platform for Pan-Government of India initiatives and action.

    7. Linkages with major National Programmes.
    Linkages will be established with NREGS, Bharat Nirman and National Horticulture Mission.DetailsPRESS RELEASE ON ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE OF GROUND WATER

    1. We know that groundwater management is critical to India’s water, food and livelihood security. Groundwater supports more than 55% of our irrigation requirements, 85% of domestic requirements in rural areas and over 50% of requirements in urban and industrial uses in the country. With water levels declining, we need a national movement for recharge. The first meeting of the Artificial Recharge of Groundwater Advisory Council met this morning to deliberate on how the movement for rainwater harvesting and artificial recharge can be made more effective and transformed into a people’s movement.

    The decisions/recommendations of the Council are:
    1. The Government of India has constituted a Central Goundwater Authority under the provision of the Environment Protection Act 1986 to control and regulate groundwater development and management in the country. A comprehensive model bill for regulation of groundwater development and management has been framed and circulated to all the states for adoption. The Model Bill provides for the setting up of State Groundwater Authority on similar consideration as the CGWA. The Model Bill also envisages issue of direction to the state local bodies/institutions for making rainwater harvesting mandatory in feasible areas. The Council suggested that those states which have not yet enacted suitable legislation may be persuaded to do so and urged the Ministry to organize a chief minister’s conference as early as possible to discuss these issues.

    2. All 1065 blocks categorized as over-exploited/critical and semi-critical need to adopt artificial groundwater recharge measures adopting appropriate area specific technology. The Council felt concerned about this decline and suggested urgent action by the Central Groundwater Board to prioritise action for recharge and rainwater harvesting in these districts.

    3. The Council recommended that the Ground Water Board will prioritise the work on the 31 districts, which have been identified as ‘farmers’ distress hot spot’, districts. It will provide assessment of ground water availability and possibility of artificial recharge in these districts. It is necessary to evolve a system of information sharing and access for the civil society in general and farmers in particular to ensure adoption of optimum methods and effective strategies in this regard, so that the present situation where failed borewells are adding to the debt burden of farmers can be ended.

    4. With a view to regulate the withdrawal of groundwater, the Central Ground Water Authority (CGWA) has circulated a list of 1615 assessment units (over-exploited, critical and semi-critical) to State Pollution Control Boards and the Ministry of Environment & Forests for regulating withdrawal of ground water by industries. It has also notified 20 critical over-exploited areas banning further extraction of ground water and has notified 51 areas for registration of ground water extraction structures for further regulation.

    The Council suggests that there is need to regulate large users of groundwater particularly industrial users. The Council resolved to set up a sub-committee to work on a policy for water for industries, which provides the framework for regulation as well as incentives for economic use for large users of groundwater. This policy can be put to the Council at its next meeting for further discussion and finalisation.

    5. The Council endorses the recommendation of the National Commission on Farmers that crops like ragi, bajra, jowar and pulses that utilize less water, and are grown by farmers in rainfed areas could be made part of the public distribution system.

    6. Artificial Recharge of groundwater aquifers require adoption of different technologies under different ecological and hydro-geological situations. The modern recharge technologies must be integrated with the diversity of community managed traditional water harvesting technologies. The Council suggested that there is a need to develop separate technologies for recharge specifically for urban areas.

    7. The Council resolved to set up a sub-committee which takes into account the manuals/material developed by the CGWB and suggest strategies for wider and more effective dissemination of available information and know-how, up to the user level.

    The Sub-Committee may comprise the following:-
    1. Ms. Sunita Narayan - Chairperson
    2. Mr. Anna Hazare
    3. Mr. Rajinder Singh
    4. Ms. Rohani Nilekani
    5. Mr. Achyut Das
    6. Member, CGWB
    7. JS (Administration), Ministry of Water Resources, Government of India.

    8. One media person to be recommended by the Press Council of India.

    2. National Congress on Groundwater.
    To facilitate the sharing of information a National Congress on Groundwater will be organized once a year for achieving coordination with government agencies, NGOs, industries and academia. An annual award for outstanding village community working on Pani Panchayat will be instituted and given at this Congress. The Ministry will constitute a committee for preparing guidelines for this award.

    3. FINALISATION OF MEMBERS UNDER CATEGORY (B) OF RESOLUTION.
    Secretaries in-charge of Water Resources of the following States were nominated by the Advisory Council for inclusion as members on rotational basis (for two years):
    1. West Bengal
    2. Rajasthan
    3. Punjab
    4. Madhya Pradesh
    5. Karnataka
    6. Meghalaya
    7. J & K

    The Advisory Council suggested that there should be a separate representation of the island States in view of specific problems faced by them and recommended nomination of Secretary in-charge of Water Resources of Andaman & Nicobar Islands as a member of the Advisory Council.

    4. Follow up on Prime Minister’s Suggestions

    1. More crop and income per drop of water
    A sub-committee with Prof. M. S. Swaminathan as Chairman and scientists from IARI, ICRISAT, CRIDA, CAZRI, Agricultural Universities and Central Water Commission and Central Ground Water Board will prepare a paper within two months. This will be considered at the next meeting of the Council.

    2. Paani Panchayats
    This will be discussed with the Minister for Panchayati Raj and concrete steps will be taken to set up community managed Water Banks.

    3. Avoiding failed Bore Wells.
    The 31 agrarian distress hot spot areas will be taken up immediately for providing the best available scientific advice.

    4. Linkage with the National Rain-fed Area Authority
    The Council can function in close coordination with the proposed Authority.

    5. Nationwide Campaign for Recharge.
    A water literacy movement will be launched, including the use of the Village Knowledge Centres or Gyan Chaupals. A content consortium will be formed for every major agro-climatic zone.

    6. Achieving Convergance and Coherence among Government Departments/Agencies.
    The Council will function as a platform for Pan-Government of India initiatives and action.

    7. Linkages with major National Programmes.
    Linkages will be established with NREGS, Bharat Nirman and National Horticulture Mission.

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    Thumbs up Press Release - Programmes and Activities related to declaring 2007 as Water Year.

    Press Release

    Programmes and Activities related to declaring 2007 as Water Year

    New Delhi
    January 05, 2007

    Year 2007 declared as "Water Year"

    The Union Cabinet, at its meeting on 4.1.2007 has accepted the proposal of Ministry of Water Resources and decided to declare the year 2007 as "Water Year", with a view to address the water related issues in a focused manner, ensure successful implementation of policies and programmes and to launch a massive awareness programme all over the country.

    India faces challenges in the water sector in the form of declining per capita availability of water, over-exploitation of ground water resources leading to lowering of ground water table in certain pockets, deterioration in the water quality, cost and time over-runs in the completion of irrigation & multi-purpose projects and poor maintenance of the existing systems. Of course, the most important challenge is to appropriately address the natural disasters related to water i.e. flood and drought.

    The water availability for the country as a whole has been assessed as 1869 billion cubic metres (BCM). However, it is estimated that only about 1123 BCM can be utilized which includes 690 BCM of surface water and 433 BCM of replenishable ground water resources.

    On an average for the country as a whole, the present position is better then many other countries. However, high variability in the availability of water in India, both in space and time are well known. Most of the water resources of the country is generated from the rainfall during the monsoon period and that too, from a few spells of intense rainfall. As a result, the country continues to suffer from flood-drought-flood syndrome. It is necessary to create infrastructures and adopt appropriate practices to augment the utilizable water resources and improve the efficiency of created facilities. At present the per capita storage capacity in India is only about 207 cubic metres as compared to 1111 cubic metres in China. As a result of growing population, the per capita water availability of India is declining every year and as per an estimate, it will be about 1,341 cubic metres by the year 2025 and about 1,140 cubic metres by the year 2050 which is much below the water-stress threshold of 1,700 cubic metres. Therefore, it is necessary to create infrastructures and adopt appropriate management practices to augment the utilizable water resources and improve the efficiency of the created facilities.

    There is need to address these important issues on priority through integrated and comprehensive approach and by adopting latest techniques and technologies with active participation of all stakeholders.

    Due emphasis has been given to issues related to water resources development and management by the Government of India. The National Common Minimum Programme has laid emphasis on water sector. It states that public investment in irrigation will be stepped up in a significant manner at the very earliest and that water management in all its aspects, both irrigation and drinking purposes, will receive urgent attention. Irrigation and drinking water are two important components of Bharat Nirman. The "Approach to 11th Plan" brought out by Planning Commission has also laid due emphasis on water resources development and management.

    In view of this background, it has been decided to declare the Year 2007 as "Water Year". Some of the important activities planned during the Water Year-2007 include: a) a meeting of the National Water Resources Council to be held and chaired by the Prime Minister and attended by all Chief Ministers; b) National Congress on Ground Water; c) Farmers Participatory Action Research Programme in 5000 villages to promote ‘more crop & income per drop of water’; d) Training of Water Masters in each Pani Panchayat and institution of an Award for the best Pani Panchayat; e) Wider dissemination of know-how to the user level through electronic & printing media; f) Organisation of Workshops/Seminars on water related technical & management issues; g) Participation in festivals, fairs, training programme, mass awareness programmes etc.

    ******
    Major Programmes and Activities related to declare
    Year 2007 as “Water Year”

    Sl. No. Major Activities
    1 National Water Resources Council meeting to be chaired by Hon’ble Prime Minister with participations of Chief Minister’s and Central Ministers.
    2 Celebration of World Water Day by organizing a curtain raiser in Delhi and functions in various parts of the country by the field offices of the organizations under the Ministry.
    3 National Congress on Ground Water will be organized during 2007.
    4 Institution of an annual award for outstanding village community working on Pani Panchayat.
    5 Formal launching of more crop and income per drop of water.
    6 Holding of Artificial Recharge of Ground Water Advisory Council meeting.
    7 Initiation of Farmers Participatory Action Research Programme though Agricultural Universities/ICAR Institutes/ICRISAT and WALMIS in 5000 villages.
    8 Release of report on policy for large Industrial users of Ground Water
    9 Release of manuals on strategies for wider and more effective dissemination of available information and know-how upto user level.
    10 Campaign on conservation of water through Print media on specific occasions such as Independence Day 2007 etc.
    11 Training one woman and one man as Water Master in each Pani Panchayat covering 5000villages.
    12 Campaign on conservation of water through Radio and Television.
    13 Participation in festivals, fairs etc. such IITF-2007, Krishi Expo 2007, 8th Water Asia likely to be held in Sep.-Oct. 2007 and one or two fairs to be held in North East etc.
    14 Organisation of Workshop/Seminar on technical and management issues related to water resources.
    15 Printing and distribution of cartoon booklets with the theme of water conservation for children.
    16 Mass Awareness Programmes to be organized by CGWB in rain water harvesting and artificial recharge to ground water for general public, schools and colleges etc.
    17 Water Management training programme to be organized by CGWB to the States and Central Govt. officials, Engineers, Architects, Drillers and other voluntary agencies.
    18 To carry out ground water management studies to design area specific ground water development and management plan.
    19 Establishing/updation of data storage and information system to store, process and disseminate ground water data.
    20 To carry out demonstrative artificial recharge and rain water harvesting studies to develop/update area specific methodologies.
    Last edited by ca_news; 16-08-2011 at 05:06 PM.

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    Thumbs up Press Release - Report on More Crop & Income per Drop of Water.

    Press Release


    Ministry of Water Resources
    Government of India


    Report on "More Crop & Income per Drop of Water"

    I. Background

    The Ministry of Water Resources had constituted an Advisory Council on Artificial Recharge of Ground Water under the Chairmanship of Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon'ble Minister of Water Resources. The first meeting of the Council was held on 22nd July'06 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi and was inaugurated by Dr. Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India. In his inaugural address, the Prime Minister mentioned that "We have to minimize our water use - invest in science and technology to ensure that we can grow crops which use less water. In other words, find ways of valuing the crop per drop". To implement the suggestion of the Prime Minster, the Council in its first meeting constituted a Sub-Committee under the Chairmanship of Dr. M.S.Swaminathan to prepare a report on "More Crop and Income per Drop of Water". The Sub-Committee consisted of representatives of Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Rural Development, National Fishery Development Board, CGWB, CWC, Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) and Agricultural Scientists from IARI, CRIDA, CAZRI, ICRISAT and State/ Central Agriculture Universities/ Institutes. The Sub-Committee held two brainstorming sessions to come out with its report. The report was presented by Dr. M.S.Swaminathan to Hon'ble Minister of Water Resources on Gandhi Jayanti the 2nd Oct'06.

    Speaking on this occasion. Dr. Swaminathan said that the report gives details of implementable action plans incorporating technologies along with their economics. The steps that can be taken for Rabi crops have been highlighted so that action can begin from ensuing Rabi season itself. He also said that the report is being presented on 2nd October, the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi to remind ourselves of the eternal truth behind Gandhiji's statement "Nature provides for everybody's needs, but not for everyone's greed". On this day we dedicate ourselves to replacing the spread of greed revolution with ever- green revolution based on the Principle of Jal Swaraj. He further expressed the hope that the Government will accept the recommendations of the Sub-Committee which will go a long way in increasing agricultural output and resultant income of the farmers. He thanked Dr K.Palanisami and Shri S.M.Sood for their outstanding contributions to the preparation of the Report.

    II. Spreading technologies efficient in water use and economically beneficial

    Already successful technologies have been developed by different institutes in different agro-ecological regions and they need to be up-scaled to benefit larger community. For example, in Madhya Pradesh in 2 m ha water logged regions, with the broad bed and furrow (BBF), short duration soybean cultivars like Samrat along with balanced nutrient management options and minimum tillage for chickpea/wheat crops could double farmers' incomes and minimize land degradation. In Indo Gangetic Plains (IGP), simple seed priming technique i.e., soaking chickpea seeds in water and micronutrient solution for six hours and drying in shade could establish good chickpea crop in rice fallow areas and increase crop production and incomes by using residual soil moisture. This technology can be applied in 12 m ha rice fallows in India spread in MP, Orissa, Jharkhand, West Bengal and Chattisgarh.

    In Kashmir region, micro-irrigation @ 70m3/ha in 10'irrigations during reproductive period increases productivity of saffron by over 50%. Apple yield can be increased to more than 40t/ha using pressurized irrigation system in karewas. Strawberry under low cost poly-house matured 45 days earlier than outdoors and productivity increases substantially.

    In Tamilnadu, precision farming approach involving drip and fertigation and pit method of irrigation in sugarcane increased the-yield and income of the crops by 20 %. In Gujarat, G-9 variety of drilled paddy increased the crop productivity to 2.5 tons/ha with high water use efficiency. In the coastal regions, about 10 million ha. are water logged in coastal Orissa, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and Bihar. Digging out aquaculture ponds raised about 35% of the area under embankment by 1-1.5 metres. Growing fish and prawn in dugout ponds and fruits and vegetables in embankments and rice in part of the farm increased the water productivity up to 7 times.

    III. Highlights

    It is important to popularize System of Rice Intensification technology (SRI) which requires less quantity of seeds, less nursery area, saves water and labour and enhance yield. This method can be extended to other crops like sugarcane. Further, upland rice technologies like periodical wetting and drying should be expanded wherever possible. This will also help in the control of mosquito breeding in the rice fields.

    Micro Irrigation technology e.g. drip and sprinkler irrigation including drip fertigation to increase productivity of crops with less water should also be popularized with adequate support from the Government.. Needed credit facilities should be available to the farmers to pay for the equipment.

    Our soils are not rich in nutrients and hence supply of sufficient and balanced nutrients to the soil through Integrated Nutrient Management will enhance soil health and the yield of the crops. Particular attention is needed to the supply of micro-nutrients like zinc, boron and sulphur.

    Since water shortage is experienced in different seasons, promotion of crop diversification with high value but less water requiring crops like pulses and oil seeds and multiple uses of water will enhance crop yield and income of the farmers. Hence demonstrations and adaptive research programmes will be very useful-Farmers normally face price uncertainties. Hence, adequate support for marketing and market information be given to farmers. Suitable models of farming systems, i.e., crop-livestock integrated farming should be encouraged and experimented with farmers participation.

    Since, crop insurance will safeguard farmers during weather uncertainties, introduction of weather based crop insurance for minimizing the losses to farmer is also recommended. A credit linked development plan for homogeneous area can be prepared in coordination with banks, farmers, traders, processors, exporters, NGOs, Panchayats and Government Development Departments.

    In order to implement successfully the recommendations, a 3-tier setup at Village, State and National level is suggested. At National level a Pan Government of India Steering Committee consisting of representatives of various Departments associated with irrigation, agriculture and Planning Commission, Finance, NABARD, Mass Media etc. has been suggested. The Steering Committee may report to Agricultural Coordination Committee, chaired by the Prime Minister.

    Given the importance of the subject, adequate provisions in Eleventh Plan for inclusion of the measures for augmentation of water supply such as water control measures, bench marking of irrigation projects, reforms in water harvesting norms, refocusing on tanks and ponds as main water harvesting components be made. For demand management side, provisions for micro irrigation 'techniques like drip/ sprinkler including drip fertigation, system of rice intensification technique, improving soil health, weather based crop insurance, market improvement and capacity building will be included. To keep pace with the future demand, A Research Network on biotechnology and water security is also recommended,

    Given the strategies and their importance in improving the productivity and income per unit of water, solid action plans are needed. Hence, year 2007-08 may be declared as the Year of More Crop and Income per Drop of Water with the simultaneous implementation of 5000 Farmer Participatory Action Research Programmes with the help of Agricultural Universities, Research Institutes, ICRISAT, WALMIs, etc .

    The Farmer Participatory Action Research Programme can cover during 2007-08, 5000 villages in different agro-climatic regions. In such village, all the available technologies will be taken to farmer's fields, jointly with farm families. In these 5000 villages, 1 woman and 1 man from every panchayat will be trained as Water Masters. In addition, a water literacy movement will be launched. This programme will involve the participation of 50 Agricultural Universities, ICAR institutes, ICRISAT and WALMIs. Data on both the water saved through efficient use and the additional income earned will be calculated.

    The Gram Sabhas in the villages will serve as Pani-panchayats and will provide overall guidance and support to this programme. The Farmer Participatory Action Research projects will be so designed that a small government programme involving an outlay of Rs 25 crores can trigger a mass movement for more yield and income per drop of water.

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    Thumbs up Press Release - Declaring of Year 2007 as Water Year.

    Press Release


    DECLARATION OF YEAR 2007 AS ‘WATER YEAR’ BY GOVT. OF INDIA

    The National Common Minimum Programme assigns priority to the water sector and water management. Irrigation and drinking water are also two important components of Bharat Nirman. Emphasis has been given to water resources development and management by the Central Government. For successful implementation of water resources development programme, it would be essential to bring all the stakeholders viz policy makers and decision makers, project managers and local authorities, NGO’s, communities, social workers and individuals and also the private sectors to ensure successful implementation of the policies and programmes for better management and development of the water sector. With a view to generate the required response from all stakeholders and to involve them in drawing up more appropriate strategies, the Government of India has declared the Year 2007 as “Water Year” with the focus on:

    a) Developing consensus on appropriate measures including legislation on better management of the water sector including participatory irrigation management, regulated use and conservation.
    b) Timely completion of irrigation projects and maintenance of existing projects to ensure water availability to farmers.
    c) awareness programmes for the masses;
    d) organization of conferences, workshops on important development and management issues

    A copy of the calendar depicting major programmes and activities to be undertaken during the year 2007 by the Ministry of Water Resources are given at Annexure.

    During the Water Year 2007, the CGWB proposes to take up 50 Mass Awareness and 50 Water Management Training Programmes, ground water studies in 1.5 lakh sq km. area in various ground water problem specific areas, 15 demonstrative artificial recharge and rain water harvesting studies, release of 50 block wise ground water booklets for dissemination of information to stakeholders.
    Annexure.


    MAJOR PROGRAMMES AND ACTIVITIES RELATED TO DECLARING YEAR 2007 AS “WATER YEAR”

    Sl. No. Schedule Major Activities
    1. Jan. - Dec, 2007 Campaign on conservation of water through Radio and Television
    2. Jan. - Dec, 2007 Printing and distribution of cartoon booklets with the theme of water conservation for children.
    3. Jan.- Dec, 2007 Mass Awareness programmes to be organised by CGWB in rain water harvesting and artificial recharge to ground water for general public, schools & colleges etc.
    4. Jan. - Dec, 2007 Water Management training programmes to be organized by CGWB to the States and Central Govt. officials, Engineers, Architects, Drillers and other voluntarily agencies
    5. Jan. - Dec, 2007 To carry out ground water management studies to design area specific ground water development and management plan.
    6. Jan. - Dec, 2007 Establishing / updation of data storage and information system to store, process and disseminate ground water data.
    7. Jan. - Dec, 2007 To carry out demonstrative artificial recharge and rain water harvesting studies to develop / update area specific methodologies.
    8. Feb.-March, 2007 National Water Resources Council meeting to be chaired by Hon’ble Prime Minister with participations of Chief Minister’s and Central Ministers.
    9. March, 2007 Celebration of World Water Day by organizing a curtain raiser in Delhi and functions in various parts of the country by the field offices of the organizations under the Ministry.
    10. April, 2007 Organisation of National Congress on Ground Water.
    11. April, 2007 Institution of an annual award for outstanding village community working on Pani Panchayat
    12. April, 2007 Formal launching of more crop and income per drop of water
    13. May, 2007 Holding of Artificial Recharge of Ground Water Advisory Council meeting
    14. June - Dec, 2007 Training one women and one man as Water Master in each Pani Panchayat covering the 5000 villages.
    15. June, 2007 Initiation of Farmers Participatory Action Research Programme through Agricultural Universities/ICAR Institutes/ICRISAT and WALMIS in 5000 villages
    16. July, 2007 Release of manuals on strategies for wider and more effective dissemination of available information and know-how upto user level.
    17. August, 2007 Campaign on conservation of water through Print media on specific occasions such as Independence Day-2007 etc.
    18. Sept.-Oct., 2007 Participation in festivals, fairs etc. such as IITF-2007, Krishi Expo-2007, 8th Water Asia likely to be held in Sep.-Oct., 2007 and one or two fairs to be held in North East etc.
    19. Sept.-Dec., 2007 Organisation of Workshop/Seminar on technical and management issues related to water resources.

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    Thumbs up Press Release - Global Rainwater Harvesting.

    Press Release

    Global Rainwater Harvesting


    For Full Detail Please Click Here

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